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Realistic Pokemon 460: Abomasnow
The hunter becomes the hunted as a mother Abomasnow with young Snover in tow successfully manages to kill a Weavile that had been stalking a slow-moving Bergmite. 


"It whips up blizzards in mountains that are always buried in snow. It is the abominable snowman."
- Diamond Abomasnow Pokedex Entry

This claim is based off a misconception, but an easy one to make at that. This rarely seen species does in fact live in mountainous snowy regions. Whipping up blizzards, however, is far beyond its capacity. It may stir up large quantities of snow when taking off, sure, but it is not nearly capable of creating or controlling full-fledged blizzards. It does, however, frequently hunt in blizzards. The reason for this is quite simple: it uses the confusion of the blizzard to hunt disoriented prey, and can usually successfully ambush them under the cover of the swirling flecks of snow and shrieking winds. Ancient Kalos and Sinnoh tales tell of a great hulking white beast with arms like trees and a silent approach, which grew into the myth of the so-called "abominable snowman." This ancient tale is based off of real sightings of Abomasnow, so in a way, it is the abominable snowman. 


"It blankets wide areas in snow by whipping up blizzards. It is also known as "The Ice Monster." 
- Pearl Abomasnow Pokedex Entry

See the description above to see why they are associated with blizzards. Along with "abominable snowman", "yeti", and "blizzard hunter", "The Ice Monster" is simply another word for this animal that is less descriptive and more cryptic. 


"They appear when the snow flowers bloom. When the petals fall, they retreat to places unknown again." 
- Platinum Abomasnow Pokedex Entry

Snow flowers, a title associated with many species of plants, typically bloom during or before snowfall (they are some of the only flowers able to survive the harsh conditions, and actually prefer to grow in them), so are usually associated with colder climates and snow. These are the conditions Abomasnow favors. When winter reaches the lowlands, usually the birds migrate down from the mountains and tundra to the forests and grasslands below, as their territories are increased and there are more food options. When snow flowers die (they typical time from blooming to death is about 3 months), and their petals start to fall off, it is a sign that the temperature is rising again and winter is coming to an end. The Abomasnow, recognizing the warmer temperatures, retreat to their mysterious mountainous and tundra homes for the rest of the year. 


"It lives a quiet life on mountains that are perpetually covered in snow. It hides itself by whipping up blizzards." 
- HeartGold & SoulSilver Abomasnow Pokedex Entries

Again, they do not actually create blizzards, but they do in fact hide in them, as they use them for cover to ambush prey or hide from the few predators they possess: namely, humans. They like snow-covered mountainsides as they have adapted a color scheme that requires a background similar to this habitat, so are somewhat specialized. In terms of quiet life, this is accurate: they rarely make vocalizations, prefer to remain by themselves, and never go out of their way to harm humans or Pokemon they do not consider as food.




As pictured, Abomasnow, or the Green-Winged Owl as some call it, is a predatory species that usually consumes mid-size to large mammals and birds. It does so normally by approaching silently, fluttering low over the ground towards its prey. It manages to do this with specialized wing feathers that absorb noise usually produced by wing-flapping and slightly altering any air turbulence individual feathers encounter. Once they are close enough, they will splay their talons and grab the unfortunate prey item, usually just staying where it is and not taking it anywhere, unless it is a mother with developing young or if it is in rival territory: then they will quickly grab the prey and take off towards their destination. Prey is usually instantly killed by impact, but if it isn't, a quick bite to the throat with the curved, snapping beak usually does the trick. That wasn't necessary on this predatory Weavile. 


Weavile is a relatively large species of predatory mustelid found in cold, snowy areas. They are a fearsome species, capable of causing animals many times their size to back down from a kill, but it won't work on Abomasnow. It is most closely related to other mustelids such as Floatzel and Furret. They have sharp claws, powerful jaws, and keen hearing, but it just wasn't enough to defend against the lethal, silent attack of Abomasnow. They commonly prey on mammals and birds, such as this Bergmite, which they can usually kill with their sharp, curved claws. Their bright red coloration seems like an obvious giveaway, but they usually hide in thick bushes or clumps of trees anyway, so they don't attract much attention. The colorful sections of the body are used in attracting mates and are used in courtship maneuvers. 


Bergmite is a species of pangolin found in the colder regions of Kalos and Sinnoh. They have adapted a bluish-white coloration to blend in better with their icy, bleak habitat. Their protective scales are useful against attack, and they often curl their tail around their head and neck when being attacked to protect them. However, even their scales wouldn't be enough to stand up to the razor sharp claws of a Weavile, so this lucky individual gets to walk another day. They move slowly as their tough, scaly armor weighs them down considerably. 


Snover are the offspring of Abomasnow, just juvenile owls. Their most defining characteristic is the large clump of feathers on the top of their head, which resembles a snow-covered plant or rock. This may seem strange, but it makes sense when you take their behavior into account. When Snover leave their mother (typically at about a month of age), they are essentially defenseless against predators. So, they hide. They bury themselves in soil or snow, up to their head, and allow their feathery crest to stick out. In this way, they can hide in plain sight, with their crest just being another bush or rock. The reason for their brown lower bodies is because of the soil stains they get on their feathers from burrowing into the earth. Oh, and those edible berries it grows? Those are actually just protein-filled berries it hides in its thick feathers.



Inspiration and Why I Chose It: My Abomasnow and Snover are plainly owls. I thought they were owls partly thanks to Arvalis's works, as he portrayed them as owl-like...troodontids, I suppose. I then took into account that their "fingers" could be wing feathers, and their arms wings. The rest just kind of conglomerated into what we have here. I specifically based my Abomasnow off of a certain species of Arctic owl, the Snowy Owl of course. That's what inspired their feathery feet and "scaled" feathers on the underside. 

Weavile is based mostly off of a wolverine, seeing as how I did not want mine to be a cat like DragonlordRynn's. It was not a felid, and it lived in cold regions. It was a four-legged, presumably mammalian, carnivore. That narrowed it down to a few types of animals. I chose mustelids.

Bergmite was tricky at first. I wanted to have a mammalian animal, as cold-blooded creatures, like amphibians, reptiles, or invertebrates (I was originally torn between invertebrates and reptiles) don't do too well in cold snowy climates. But I still needed an armored animal for its evolution, Avalugg. Then it hit me. Avalugg could be an armadillo-like creature, with armor segments, and Bergmite would need to be a similar type of creature, so I went for pangolins. Not very closely related, but close appearance-wise, and it worked. 



So there you have it guys. The first piece of art in my series! Hope you guys like, and don't forget to suggest Pokemon for me to draw realistically!


P.S.: Bonus points if you manage to find the other Snover. 
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Alright, finishing off the Bulbasaur lineage with Venusaur and Mega Venusaur!



Greater Flower-Back
Bulbusreptilium magna
Length: 6-7 feet
Weight: 150-230 lbs.
Height: 6-7 feet (at shoulder)
Diet: Roots, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, nuts, berries, seeds, bark, shoots, leaves, invertebrates, eggs, occasionally small vertebrates, garbage
Habitat: Forested plains and savannas, treed grasslands, wooded prairies
Range: Kanto, Johto, and Central Kalos


The third, usually final growth stage in a Greater Flower-Back's life is popularly known as "Venusaur." A fully grown adult Venusaur is truly an intimidating sight, being from 6 to 7 feet long, from 150 to 230 pounds, and being 6 to 7 feet at the shoulder, with the flower on their back typically being another 3 or 4 feet. Their size will vary noticeably depending upon subspecies and the amount of food available to an individual. This growth stage is a dark bluish-green, more so than its previous growth stages. Unlike its previous growth stages, it lacks the scattered darker scales on the body that are present in Bulbasaur, and, to an extent, Ivysaur. Their dark coloration would normally restrict them to the darkest parts of the forested grasslands or full on woodlands or groves: that is, if they were the size of Ivysaur. Being much larger, and having very few predators, they can afford to remain in forested grasslands and wooded savannas. Still, in areas where they do have predators, they are usually found in groves and dense forests. This is because they are better camouflaged with the darker plants and shadows than in the more open grasslands. In this stage, their eyes have also gone back to possessing white pupils, still having red irises and barely noticeable white scleras. This is because in this stage they don't need eyesight as much as they have much fewer predators, and can rely upon their keen hearing and excellent sense of smell. The white patches around the eyes are very prominent in this stage, designed to make the eyes appear larger, so narrow the probability of a predator going for the actual eyes. They are squat, stocky, muscular animals, rather low to the ground compared to most other therapsid species. Because of this build, they cannot run very fast at all, so in a way they have traded speed for strength. They are strong for several reasons, but one of the main ones is to support the heavy flower on their back. Their jaws are exceptionally powerful, in the wild used for crushing nuts and seeds mainly, though also the bones of any predator daring to attack it. The scaled ridges above the eyes are perhaps the most prominent in this stage than any other, with the large spikes at the back of the head being particularly noticeable. There is a reason why though. The spines, as stated previously, are used to denote males and females: males have longer, more impressive spikes, females, shorter, less impressive ones. But in this stage, they also serve a second purpose: to ward off predators and rivals. They have  skin stretched across a portion of the spikes, and that skin can be flushed with blood, turning it a bright reddish-pink. By flushing the blood into these spikes, the spikes become brighter and even more noticeable, likely putting off any rival individuals or potential predators. This is frequently seen before fights or battles in the wild. Because of the pinkish coloration, they are frequently mistaken for ears. The wide, broad mouth can be used to intake large quantities of food at once, and ends in a sharp, hooked beak, which can be used to snap plant stems and meat alike. While mainly used for digging up food, it can also be used for defense against predators, as can the two large conical tusks, one on either side of the beak in the upper jaw. It also possesses four noticeable tusks on the lower jaw, but these are used mainly in feeding. It rarely needs to use them, so does not sharpen them frequently, but when it has to, it will usually use fallen trees, logs, or rocks. Their long, curved claws are useful when digging up food and slashing at enemies alike.



Classification and Growth Stages
Please consult the Bulbasaur profile for more information on this specie's evolutionary tree, but anyone who has studied up the least bit on prehistoric animals will instantly recognize, and rightfully so, that it is a dicynodont. This can be easily told by their squat, muscular build, strong legs, curved beak, and tusks, not to mention their short tails. The group as a whole was believed to have gone extinct in the Permian or Triassic period, but some survived: as to how, scientists are still researching, but for a theory, consult the Bulbasaur profile.


Venusaur and Mega Venusaur both belong to the same species, fairly rare for a "Mega" evolved animal, as most are different species, in the same genus, which are believed to be evolved from each other based on their similar appearances. The species that Venusaur and Mega Venusaur are is the Greater Flower-Back, the sole member of the Flower-Back family. 


An adult Greater Flower-Back will very rarely get a second growth stage, but the circumstances if it does so are very simple. If a Flower-Back reaches a great age, generally more than 70 years, they will grow into a second stage, "Mega Venusaur." More on this is described in the section for that growth stage, but essentially, when it is growing, it shows the same behavior as Bulbasaur and Ivysaur show when growing into their next stage. Sleeping for long periods of the day or even whole days is not uncommon, and irritability when woken up is to be expected. Generally tired and lethargic, when growing, they try not to exert themselves physically at all, and will eat very little or even nothing. When they are finished growing, they will eat ravenously over the course of the next day or days, to satisfy their aching stomachs after not eating for days or even weeks. The duration of the growth stage varies, but it typically takes about 3 weeks, sometimes less, sometimes more. When ready to grow, this species will find a suitable spot and hunker down, not bothering to go anywhere special like Bulbasaur. 






Biology & Reproduction
As an adult, the Greater Flower-Back is fully developed, and so is its flower. The flower instantly catches the eye of any person that happens to see an adult individual, and indeed, in the wild, many a researcher (including me, on several occasions) has been bewildered to see a large flower seemingly moving of its own accord, their eyes drawn to it, and only after taking it in realize that it is in fact a Venusaur trundling about. The plant and how it enters the animal's body are described in the Bulbasaur profile, but aspects of their biology that have not been mentioned will be discussed here. The Floremagnus giganticus has now reached its average adult stage: it grows a bit more if it gets enough sunlight and water. The flower still needs regular sun and water, but can survive on less than in previous growth stages, which is one reason why most animals do not grow into "Mega Venusaur": they don't need as much sunlight, so don't stay in it for as long as they need for the flower to grow into its final stage. The flower has now revealed itself, as well as a scaly trunk and leaves. In this stage, its vines are still not as powerful as they were as babies, but they are still a force to be reckoned with, about 8 feet long and tipped with razor-sharp, curved spines, which can actually be retracted into the vine itself if necessary. The huge pink flower, far from being a signal to predators, is in fact both a warning to predators and an invitation to prey. The color of the flower warns a predator of the animal's strength: light, whitish flowers mean a weak animal, while bright pink ones mean a strong animal. Dull, dark ones signify an animal that is not getting enough water or sunlight. It also acts as a beacon for prey. Prey, attracted by the bright colors of the flower, will usually not realize it is attached to an animal until it is too late: the animal can simply grab the unfortunate prey with its vines and eat it. All parts of the plant have a neural link to the brain, allowing the animal to control the plant as it wishes. Its vines are most frequently used, but the dark green leaves can also be used, to fold up around the flower and conceal it from sight. This is usually only done if they know they are facing a predator they cannot beat, so need to hide. The flower possesses a ridged, somewhat sharp, tough, brown, scaly trunk, for protection against possible predators that might try to cut it off at the stem. The center of the flower is fleshy, bendable, and yellow, and contains a pocket in the middle. This is where the scents are released from. Like Ivysaur, it possesses many different chemicals located in different pockets under the flower, which can be combined inside the flower to create a variety of smells, both good and bad. It generally does not release chemicals very frequently in the wild, but this is not the case for domestic animals; they will frequently emit a sweet-smelling, delicate, but carrying aroma. This chemical combination in particular actually has strong narcotics in it which can relax most vertebrates when it is breathed in. If used sparingly, they usually do not have negative effects on people or Pokemon, so is actually quite helpful. This is why people with stress or anxiety-related disorders often can be seen either keeping an Ivysaur or Venusaur, or wearing perfume that smells like the scent to calm them down. Despite this, if used too frequently and in large amounts, it can be so relaxing that it can put Pokemon and humans to sleep, a potentially very dangerous situation, outside of battle. This is one among many scents they can make, most of which are displeasing to the human nose, but excellent smelling to insects or pollinators. Some smells include those of certain flowers, rotting fruit, carrion, dung, or even the breeding pheromones of some insects or arthropods. The flowery scents will draw in pollinators, which are then eaten. The others will draw in select types of insects, which the animal can then capture and consume. The vines, while rarely used, are very effective against enemies, and can be used in different ways: to whip, to constrict, to throttle, etc. The vines are very helpful in battles, because of the thorns that line them. The vines are split at the ends, like hands, allowing it to grab prey or objects that it otherwise could not, lacking opposable thumbs or any sort of grasping ability in its feet. Because most animals, even wild, are very experienced and quick-witted, they can usually withdraw their vines before they are bitten or torn off, so generally last longer. They will grow back within a matter of days, but sometimes it just won't be quick enough, especially in areas with many predators. It will also claw and bite if necessary, but seeing as it is so slow, this generally doesn't have much of an effect. They certainly cannot run either, as their build does not allow it. They can burrow quite well, but making a burrow large enough for them to fit in may take a while, so they generally try to rely on their physical defenses instead of trying to burrow. It still needs the sun to photosynthesize the flower, albeit less, and will die if not exposed to it. In return for the animal spreading its seeds and moving it around, the flower will allow some of the energy it gains through photosynthesis to be used by the animal. It also repays the animal by being able to attract prey and camouflage the animal among plants. 


Their reproduction is fairly simple. Females will grunt, hiss, and roar to establish that they are in heat. The body language of a receptive female and a non-receptive female are very clear. A receptive female will paw the ground, shake her head, and grunt, while non-receptive females will slash the air, click their beaks, and make threatening roars, as well as trying to attack any male that tries to mate with them. It is relatively rare, but when males come into conflict over females, they will fight, long and hard. These are only occasionally observed by researchers, so each fight that is seen is videotaped. During fights, males try to ward each other off non-physically at first. They will paw the ground, swish their tails, flush blood into their spikes, hiss, roar, and open their mouths wide, showing their sharp beak and tusks. If this fails, they will fight, smashing their tough skulls into each other's heads. The first one to back down or fall over loses, while the victorious individual gains the other's food, territory, and females. In terms of courtship behavior, they have none, not really needing to show off, as they have proved their strength by battling. Males who have not battled another usually need to show their strength to females, by, say, pushing over trees or other similar shows of power and healthiness. The female has a gestation period of about 3 or 4 months. Once ready to lay her eggs, she picks an area of about 30 square feet to lay her eggs. She typically has 3 clutches of eggs, spread out between two or three nests. 20 to 25 eggs will be laid in each nest. After digging the rudimentary, shallow depression in the ground, she will cover it back up to make it more difficult for predators to get to them, and to protect them from the elements. Before doing so, though, she will defecate all over her eggs. The reason for this is quite clear: it is to allow the seeds of the Floremagnus giganticus plant to penetrate the soft eggshell and then the back of the growing animal. More on that in the Bulbasaur profile. The female will typically have eaten the seeds of the flower a couple of days in advance, just so it has time to get through her system. As well as covering them with earth, she will typically collect leaves, sticks, and twigs, and put these on top of the nests, to make them more difficult to discover. She may or may not also make a false nest, digging a hole in the ground and covering it up, but not laying any eggs in it. This is to distract more intelligent predators and confuse them as to where the eggs are hidden. After being laid, the eggs typically hatch after 3 or 4 weeks, upon which time the babies will scurry off by themselves into the underbrush. They may band together for safety, they may not, but from now on, they are on their own. The mother will generally stay in the same area that she laid her eggs in (mostly because she is exhausted from laying them and is unwilling to move), but will provide no protection to the eggs if they are threatened. If there is a big enough threat, she may stand up to it, but this happens infrequently and she will often prefer to sleep. After all, laying 75 to 150 eggs in all is no mean feat. An interesting, but difficult way to determine a male from a female is by checking if the individual possesses a seed or seeds in the center of the flower on its back, in the stigma. This seed is there to tempt hungry birds or other seed-eating animals, which will hopefully carry it off, consume it, and then excrete it in droppings, as a form of seed dispersal. 


Diet, Habitat, and Range

Venusaur, due to their size, can eat essentially anything they desire, made more opportunistic due to their lack of pickiness and very adaptable diets. Their snapping beaks, tusks, and very strong stomach acid make short work of really anything that comes into their mouth. They will generally eat whatever is most prevalent in their habitats, but are more herbivorous in this stage than carnivorous. They mostly dig up roots, tubers, rhizomes, and bulbs, which are their main sources of food, but will also consume shoots, leaves, bark, twigs, grass, berries, nuts, seeds, and fallen fruit. Large invertebrates or eggs are taken as well, but vertebrates are very rare in this stage, as is carrion. Prey is mostly attracted by the scented flower, then grabbed with the vines, killed quickly by slamming it against rocks or logs, and then dropped into the mouth and swallowed. Feral individuals are extraordinarily rare, but will usually consume anything they can find in trash cans or dumpsters that is edible: banana peels, apple cores, thrown out-food, etc. 


Trainers will be fine if they feed adult Flower-Backs what they fed them as babies. They need less protein in this stage, so regular supplies of mice and crickets are not as necessary. The flower depends on the food just as much as the animal does, but this usually isn't hard to remember, as the flower is a key sign of their health. Strong, healthy adults can be used in both contests and battles alike, and often depend on healthy, nutritious foods. Try to mimic what they would eat in the wild with things you can get at a grocery store. For example, for roots, tubers, rhizomes, and bulbs, you can feed them a variety of vegetables, such as onions, garlic, shallots, turnips, carrots, radishes, parsnips, rutabaga, and sweet potatoes. For other plants, simply feed them any kind of grass shoots, leaves gathered from surrounding trees (know if they are poisonous: have an expert or a guidebook on hand to tell you), and a wide range of nuts, fruit, and berries. They will naturally consume grass, bark, and twigs, so there is no point in trying to feed them those, as they already eat them inside their Pokeballs and will also consume those plants if released from the ball. Almonds, pecans, walnuts, cashews, and more typically sate an adult's nut desire, but feel free to experiment with other nuts as well. Feeding them berries like strawberries, acai berries, blueberries, blackberries, goji berries, and cherries is a good idea, and feeding them fruits such as apples, oranges, bananas, pears, peaches, grapes, lemons, and more will definitely suffice for their fruit diet. Make sure to feed them plenty of fruit in the weeks before they grow into a "Mega" Venusaur, if they choose to do so. You can give your individual Bulbasaur candies sparingly, but don't overdo it: there are healthier options for the animal's to eat, and the candies are designed as treats anyway. They will naturally consume invertebrates inside and out of their Pokeball, but feeding them the occasional mouse, rat, or cricket will make them happy anyways. Turkey, chicken, beef, or eggs also work, though again, only occasionally. 


Venusaur can afford to live in lighter areas than their predecessors, provided the area is free of predators. Because of their size, they don't need to hide anymore, so can lie out in relatively open, light grasslands without worrying. In areas with predators, though, they generally can be found in forests and woodlands, where they camouflage better. These habitats are great for them because they provide sunning spots to warm up and photosynthesize their flower, and shady spots to cool down and sleep. They will also wallow in mud or water to cool down on hot days, if it is available. They can be found in Kanto, Johto, and the central areas of Kalos, though for various human-caused reasons are rare in all of these areas. Venusaur originated in Kanto, but have since been exported to and released in Kalos and Johto. Strict laws about releasing Pokemon of any kind have been put in place, which is why there are no wild Flower-Backs in Hoenn, Sinnoh, Unova, or Alola. These wild populations have pros and cons. The pro is that since they are breeding, they are increasing the animals's wild numbers, but the bad side is that they can wreak havoc on the populations of native species. The main reason for their export and import is, of course, for beginning Trainers to use. 




Relationship with Humans

Relations among this species and humans are strained, as they are internationally protected, as most people don't want to have anything to do with them just because of their protection. It is also strained because adult Flower-Backs are notoriously mistrusting of people, knowing what they can do to them and the power they hold.


Captive individuals have a closer bond with humans, but it is still somewhat rare. Unfortunately, even in battles adult Flower-Backs are rarely seen, because most Trainers simply don't have the patience to raise one. This is sad, because they are very ferocious, determined, persistent opponents in battle, and are good for both defense and offense and have a variety of powerful moves. Those planning to raise this species must know what they are signing up for: literally, as multiple waivers are needed to be able to keep one. Contest champions also sometimes possess Venusaur, as contests are held, albeit very occasionally, due to the general "ugliness" of these animals besides their flower. This is not really fair, seeing as how all animals possess beauty in their own ways: it just manifests in the Flower-Backs flower, not necessarily its physical body. Anyway, judges usually look for healthy, whole, good-smelling flowers,  a well-cleaned individual, and healthy mouths, eyes, and nostrils, to make sure none are diseased. These animals require a tremendous amount of care for anybody, hence why they are not often trained. Hunting is out of the question for obvious reasons. They are featured very little in cultural practices, religions, or traditions. 


Aside from being difficult to care for in terms of money (food, space, water, etc.), the other main reason they are hard to keep is their extraordinarily long lifespans. The longest lived known animal lived to an age of 132 years, 8 months, and 16 days. Many have had similarly long lifespans. The average age for an adult at the time of its death is 80 years old. To date, the oldest person who possessed a Greater Flower-Back was a man named Thomas Edwards, who got the animal when he was 10, when the animal was a baby, and died at the age of 95, while his animal survived another 15 years. It was believed that in some royal families, they would hand down the Greater Flower-Back through the generations as some kind of living family heirloom, an interesting practice, but one that was undoubtedly depressing for the animal, as it watched its new masters grow old and die repeatedly. 


Feral animals are virtually nonexistent. The reason for this is because the Pokemon Protection Association rules them as "dangerous to humans if provoked." Any animal with this classification is monitored, although not particularly closely. People can't just walk to take the trash out and be attacked by a threatened Flower-Back. So, the PPA tranquilizes or stuns animals to neutralize the threat, and then, after a thorough check-over, starts to slowly introduce the animal back into the wild. A Flower-Back might not look particularly deadly, but a single snap from its beak can sever a limb, as two teenage boys discovered in 2045. 



Social and Individual Behavior

As adults, Greater Flower-Backs are hermits, recluses, living alone and almost never interacting with other members of their own species. Even members of the same sex, gender, or growth stage are totally shunned by others. In this stage, wild animals are aggressive, though usually only to humans if provoked. During this time, females are loaded with estrogen and males with testosterone, and it comes out in violent outbursts. It gets even worse during the breeding season. Males enter a highly temperamental period known as "musth", during which they will charge anything that they believe is a threat, which can be anything from trees, to vehicles, to other animals, to even boulders and logs. Females aren't aggressive in the weeks leading up to and following mating, but may protect their nests from predators, albeit somewhat halfheartedly. Still, a charging mother Flower-Back is not a pretty sight. When aggravated, they try to ward off the threat with non-physical warnings: shaking the head, stomping, pawing the ground, whipping their vines, snapping their beak, roaring, and hissing, among other things. If this fails, they will charge, biting, snapping, clawing, whipping, throttling, constricting, and trampling the threat. When confronted with an individual that shows these signs, slowly back away and try not to pose a threat. Males are territorial animals, marking their territory with scratches and excrement, and patrolling it frequently. Females generally settle in a specific area during the  breeding season, but are nomadic outside of it, grazing in many different areas to avoid stripping a place bare of food. Males usually will engage in  head-butting contests over food, territory, and females, with the one who gives out first or falls down being the loser. 


It is only after they reach "Mega" status that they begin to calm down, as mating is now very rare, so their estrogen or testosterone levels go down. Adults are feisty, quick-tempered, but intelligent animals, at least in the wild. Wild animals are not very afraid of humans, knowing that they can beat them physically, but definitely are wary of humans, knowing that they are far more intelligent than themselves. These animals will not hide when people get near it, but will keep an eye on the intruder. Domestic animals are not only calmer in general, but much less wary of humans, knowing that they are protected by their Trainer. Captive adults are loud, but caring, gentle animals. They are usually assumed to be aggressive because of their wild counterparts and their angry appearance caused by the eye ridges. They are usually mild-mannered, having been taught to be polite and caring from an early age, in most cases. They are not usually the best actual caregivers, but are excellent watchdogs for some facilities. They are ferocious towards anything that threatens the thing they are guarding, and will protect it with its life. They are less forgiving than juveniles, but are still lenient, knowing when the Trainer couldn't help it and when they could. 




Mega Venusaur

When an adult reaches an age of usually about 70, sometimes more, sometimes less (it depends on the gender of the animal and varies in every individual), they will start to become lethargic again, showing all the signs of growing into a new growth stage like they did when growing into juveniles or adults from their previous growth stages. Picking a sunny spot, they will lie down and sleep for most of the time. While growing, they will increase in size slightly, their back flower may develop more, and the flower sends a tendril down to the animal's forehead, where it grows a flower. Their skin color will also lighten. Within a few weeks, they will be finished and free to carry on with normal life.



In this stage, they have a lighter aquamarine coloration, and a few darker scales are present on the head. They vary little in physical appearance, but their plants grow tremendously. Developing a tougher, scaly wooden stem, the flower is well supported, and it will also grow new, lighter leaves, supported by individual woody stems, which usually bend under the weight of the leaves. Thankfully, these are held up by tough, durable dark green vines the plant produces, which are thick to stand up against the friction caused by rubbing up against the woody stem of the leaves. These leaves grow in addition to a bit of growth on the original leaves. The most noticeable new characteristic, though, is the large pink flower on their head. When growing, the flower will allow a long, snake-like tendril to creep up the neck and stop just above the skull, below the skin. It will then start to grow into a flower, slowly emerging from the skin and blossoming until it reaches maturity. 


The reasons for this fourth growth stage is debated among scientists, but it is possible that it shows strength and durability in the species and is seen as a sign of a healthy, albeit weathered, old, tough male. Females will usually mate more frequently with an animal that has gone through this growth stage than they will with weaker males, which usually will not survive to the age needed to grow into the next form. The healthy new flower is seen as a sign of power and tenacity. 


Their behavior changes little, although they will generally become much less aggressive, as they have little competition when in this stage that they need to worry about, so their testosterone and estrogen levels go down. 





Tips for Keeping a Venusaur:


Most tips for keeping this species are in the previous profiles, so consult them for more information. I will discuss tips here which I have not mentioned before. 



- DON'T BERATE THEM FOR BEING AGGRESSIVE. It's not their fault. They can't control their own testosterone levels. The rise is out of their control, so don't berate or chide them for what is physically impossible for them to accomplish.

- ALLOW THEM SOME PLACE TO CALM DOWN. Adults are aggressive. It's just their nature. You need to allow them some area in which they can rest and calm down from a battle or just from themselves. This can be inside a Pokeball or out, but make sure it is a peaceful place where they cannot be injured. 

- KNOW WHAT YOU ARE GETTING INTO. A Flower-Back can live upwards of 100 years, so you need to know what you are getting into when you get one, when it is in any growth stage. That's why they have you fill out waivers: to make sure you've got what it takes. If the animal is going to live longer than you, which almost always happens, make sure there is a responsible owner or other safe area it can be sent when you cannot care for it any longer. Another Trainer is sometime used, but a better idea is a Pokemon Sanctuary, where old, injured, or otherwise impeded Pokemon go to live out the rest of their lives. Sanctuaries are peaceful places which put the animals under their care first, so you are in good hands.

- TREAT THEM WITH RESPECT. Yes, they may be aggressive. They may not always do what you want them to do. But they still deserve respect. Being such large animals, they are capable of mass destruction, and you need to respect the animal as such. Doing so will likely make it respect you, so it is a win-win relationship. 

- KNOW WHAT TO DO DURING THE BREEDING SEASON. Animals, even captive ones, will become more cheeky and aggressive during the breeding season, especially males. Even domestic males will enter musth. During this time, you may want to allow them more access to their "calm place" than you usually do, or keep them in their Pokeball for longer than normal so that they don't go on rampages and destroy property or hurt people or other Pokemon. Also, there is the tricky situation of mating. Most captive individuals have no real desire to mate, being perfectly happy under the care of their trainer. If they do want to mate, though, there is no better place to let them go than Sanctuaries, or, if you desire, possibly the Pokemon Daycare. Generally, sanctuaries are held in higher esteem because they present a more natural environment, while Daycares are a little more humanized. 

- BE CAUTIOUS WHEN APPROACHING YOUR FEMALE VENUSAUR IF IT'S GUARDING ITS EGGS. If you possess a female Flower-Back and you let it go to the sanctuary or Daycare to mate, it will usually lay eggs. It will guard these, but not especially ferociously. It will keep an eye on anything that threatens them, however. During this time, many Trainers like to stay with their animal to watch the process of hatching and care for them. This is perfectly acceptable and even recommended, as the female is probably tired, but, be cautious when first approaching her. If you come to see the female consecutively, she won't mind, but she will be a little wary of any intruder to the nest area, even you, for the first few days. Just show her you mean no harm and would like to see the eggs hatch and care for her.

- IF YOU SEE A FERAL INDIVIDUAL, CALL THE PPA. DON'T TRY TO CATCH IT: IT'S FOR YOUR OWN GOOD. Feral individuals present a definite threat to people: with their size and weaponry, they could kill a human in a matter of seconds. This is why the PPA chooses to tranquilize and/or stun animals, remove them from the area, check them over, and then slowly start to rehabilitate them back to the wild, so that they can eventually be released back to hopefully boost the population a bit. Don't try to catch one: feral Venusaur are perhaps even smarter than domestic animals, and they know what they're doing. They will have snapped off all your limbs before you can say "Holy mother of Arceus."



What Species I Chose and Why: This is my little section for explaining what animal the Pokemon is based off of and why I chose it, in case someone didn't know what it was before or just didn't look. The entire Bulbasaur evolution line are dicynodonts, tusked therapsids believed to have gone extinct in the Triassic period. Why dicynodonts, you may ask? Well, let's look at some characteristics. Low, squat, stocky, muscular build? Check. Short tail? Check. Beak, complete with tusks? Check. You can see why I did so. Some people like making them as frogs or toads. I don't, because of the beak, and the feet don't match up with that of a frog or toad. 


Alrighty, that's it for the first evolution line. Hope you guys like!!


Next up, Ivysaur!



Greater Flower-Back
Bulbusreptilium magna
Length: 3-4 feet (1 meter)
Weight: 25-30 lbs.
Height: 3-4 feet (counting bud on back)
Diet: Roots, tubers, rhizomes, bulbs, nuts, berries, seeds, leaves, bark, shoots, invertebrates, eggs, occasionally small vertebrates, garbage
Habitat: Sparsely treed grasslands, forested plains and savannas, and large prairies with trees
Range: Kanto, Johto, and Central Kalos


The second, juvenile form of the Greater Flower-Back is commonly known as "Ivysaur." This stage is larger than Bulbasaur, but still not an impressive sight, usually about 3 to 4 feet in length, from 3 to 4 feet in height, and from 25 to 30 pounds in weight. The height, of course, counts the large bud on their back, which usually measures about a foot by itself. However, their size (height, weight, length, etc.) can vary noticeably depending upon the amount of food they are able to access and which subspecies they belong to. This form is a darker bluish-green than its predecessor, but still possesses dark, scattered aquamarine scales around its body. Their coloration means that they need to live in very well forested grasslands and prairies, and sometimes they will even live in forests and abandon their grassland homes, in order to better camouflage, as their dark coloration means that they are an obvious target for any predator. They still possesses red eyes, but with black pupils in this stage. They have white patches around the eyes, often mistaken for their scleras, which are actually small and barely noticeable, most of their eyes being taken up by their irises. Despite this, the animals have only slightly better eyesight than their baby form, Bulbasaur, being able to make out objects and animals from a further distance, but still no less blurry. They still rely mostly on their hearing and smell, both of which are keen for a therapsid. They still are squat, stocky, muscular animals, trading speed for strength. They need to be strong in order to support the growing plant on their back, which steadily increases in weight. They also have powerful jaws, in order to crush nuts and seeds, among other food items. The scaled ridges above the eyes are even more prominent in this stage, and the two large spikes on the back of the head are even larger. They have black patches on them when viewed from the side, increasing their resemblance to ears. The black patches on the spikes are unknown in purpose, and seem to just be part of the animal's coloration. Like Bulbasaur, Ivysaur's spikes can tell apart males from females: males have longer, more impressive spikes, and females possess shorter, duller, less impressive spikes. These spikes are actually used in this stage by males to fight over territory and food, more on that in Social and Individual Behavior. The wide, broad snout comes together in a hooked, snapping beak, useful for protection against predators and eating alike, as are the two long, conical tusks, one on either side of the beak, on the far edge of the mouth. It will often sharpen these tusks in order to be better used against predators and rival individuals, as they are often worn down by rooting for food with them. Usually rocks, logs, or fallen trees will do for this job. It also has long, curved claws which it uses to dig and burrow, usually for food, but also for a place to flee from predators if necessary. 



Classification and Growth Stages
For more information on this subject, please consult the Bulbasaur profile. As stated in that profile, Bulbasaur and its two to three growth stages are, as evidenced by their tusks, short tails, squat builds, and beaks, dicynodonts, which were widely believed to have gone extinct in the Permian or Triassic period. 


Venusaur, Bulbasaur, and Ivysaur, the tusked therapsids, actually all belong to one species, the Greater Flower-Back. They are one of the few animals in which all the evolutions are actually the same species. 


Like when a Bulbasaur grows into Ivysaur, when an Ivysaur grows into Venusaur, it will remain asleep for long periods of the day, be very lethargic and tired when awake, and is very irritable and even aggressive when woken up against its will. They will not exert themselves physically if possible, and will generally eat from very little to nothing when growing. To avoid any injuries caused by an aggressive, tired, growing Ivysaur, just leave it alone. This natural process, when finished, will result in the Venusaur eating tremendous amounts of food to sate its vicious hunger after not eating or eating very little amounts of food when growing. This process typically takes from 4 days to a week in terms of duration. Unlike Bulbasaur, Ivysaur, when they are ready to grow, have no such inclination to go to a specific location to grow: they will simply settle down in an area which makes them difficult to spot by predators, and start growing.

As already stated, please consult the Bulbasaur profile for more information on their classification and fascinating growth stages.




Biology
Ivysaur's most obvious and eye-catching characteristic is of course the large bud that is found on most individual's backs. Please look at the Bulbasaur profile for information on how the plant actually takes root in the animal. This is the form of the large flowering Floremagnus giganticus when sufficiently fed and watered, as well as provided with plenty of sunlight. It will eventually grow from its bulb into a beautiful bud, and also grow leaves, though doing this results in shorter, less powerful vines. The large, violently pink bud may also seem to be an obvious giveaway to predators, but it actually serves as a warning that it can bite, claw, and whip with its vines. The dark green leaves serve as camouflage, and now also possess a neural link to the brain. Now the animal can have full control and mobility over its leaves, bud, and vines, and as such can cause the leaves to roll up and hide the bud if necessary, to avoid being spotted by predators they know they cannot stand a chance against. This large bud will start to noticeably grow larger and start to unfold slightly in the weeks before it starts to grow into its next growth stage, as then the plant will grow into its final adult stage. The animal is unique because it possesses many different chemicals inside the body just below the bud, which can be moved up to the bud and combined to make various smells. Most often, it will not produce any chemical, but domestic individuals will often frequently combine two chemicals that make a very delicate, sweet, carrying scent, which has a peculiar effect on most vertebrate's minds. The sweet smell of the flower has special narcotics that serve to relax the animal or human when breathed in. The narcotics usually do not have any negative effect on Pokemon or humans, and indeed, this is why Ivysaur are often kept by people with severe depression, but if used too frequently and strongly, it can put Pokemon and people to sleep, they are so relaxed, and that can be dangerous outside of battle. However, this is only one chemical combination. They can make many others too, usually ones that are a bit more distasteful than the previous scent. By combining chemicals, they can make smells that resemble rotting fruit, carrion, and even the breeding pheromones of some insects and arthropods. The last three are mainly used in order to bring prey closer to itself so it can snatch them up in its jaws and devour them. The vines, despite being a little shorter, are still just as deadly and can be used to tremendous effect in battle, throttling or whipping enemies. It doesn't help that they are covered with hundreds of small, curved spikes that easily penetrate the skin of most other Pokemon in battles, and as such the vines are a great aspect of the animal to be used in Pokemon battles. The vines are also split at the ends, allowing them to grab objects and prey like extra hands. Ivysaur have fewer predators than Bulbasaur, but by no means few: many predators will prey upon juveniles, as they can easily rip the vines off. The vines are its main source of protection, and without them, it is near defenseless. It may claw and bite, but predators can usually get around this and kill the animal. It can regrow the vines, of course, but this takes a few days, and sometimes the animal won't have a few days. Their squat build eliminates running away as well. They can burrow efficiently though, and this can sometimes save their lives. Like babies, it depends on the sun for photosynthesis for the flower. In return for spreading seeds of its species, carrying it around, and exposing it to sunlight, the plant repays the animal by giving the animal some of its energy it gains from photosynthesis, as well as being able to attract prey and camouflage the animal. 




Diet, Habitat, and Range

Ivysaur are certainly not picky about what they eat. Their wide mouths, snapping beaks, durable tusks, and strong stomach acids mean that they can eat nearly anything in their environment. They are able to fit most of the food items they prefer in their wide mouths. Being adaptable, opportunistic omnivores, they will eat whatever is most abundant in their environment, but in this stage they are more carnivorous, taking advantage of the prey lured by the smells of their plant. They usually dig up roots, tubers, rhizomes, and bulbs for consumption, as well as eating shoots, bark, leaves, grass, twigs, nuts, berries, and fallen fruit, but will also readily consume insects, other arthropods, small mammals, reptiles, amphibians, eggs, and even carrion and ground-living birds. Small animals are usually snatched up by the vines, thrashed against the ground (if they are vertebrates or creatures with tough exoskeletons), and then dropped into the mouth and swallowed whole and sometimes alive. Feral individuals in urban environments usually eat anything consumable that they can salvage from trash cans and dumpsters, normally things like apple cores, banana peels, etc. 


Trainers need to keep in mind that they have to remember the needs of the flower as well as the animal, but this usually isn't hard since the flower is pretty noticeable.  Contest champions and Trainers always make sure to feed their Ivysaurs healthy, nutritious foods, as this will result in a healthy, strong, beautiful Venusaur, equally equipped for battle and contests alike. Onions, garlic, shallots, turnips, rutabaga, carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, and radishes all fulfill their food requirements in term of roots, tubers, rhizomes, and bulbs. You can gather leaves from surrounding trees (first check with trustworthy guidebooks or experts if they are poisonous), almost any kind of grass shoots, and many different nuts, fruits, and berries. Nuts like almonds, pecans, walnuts, and cashews are typically fed to most Ivysaur, but you can experiment with others too. For berries, you might want to think about strawberries, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, acai berries, and goji berries, for example. For fruit, apples, oranges, bananas, pears, peaches, grapes, and lemons are all good. These will especially help them in the weeks before they start growing into their next stage. Contest champions or Trainers are free to give their Ivysaur candies, but make sure not to feed them too many, as these are not the healthiest food option for Ivysaur, so feed give candies only occasionally. However, in this stage, they are more carnivorous, and need more protein. So, you need to feed them meat. Usually crickets, mealworms, waxworms, grasshoppers, crickets and the like, which can be found at many pet stores, are good staples for this growth stage. Mice may also be fed at this stage, sparingly: usually Mice Hoppers will do. You may also feed them turkey, chicken, and eggs, all of which they will gladly take. 



Ivysaur live in slightly different habitats than Bulbasaur, preferring more densely forested grasslands, plains, savannas, and prairies, and even sometimes forests or woodlands. This is to better camouflage their darker bodies with shadier surroundings. They can be found in Kanto, Johto, and the central areas of Kalos, though are rare in all of these regions. The habitats mentioned above are perfect for them because they provide equal sunny and shady areas. They prefer these areas because, unlike most therapsids, Ivysaur are actually cold-blooded, meaning that they are the temperature of the environment around them. They cannot get too warm or cold or they will not function properly. As such, they spend time in both shade and sun. By sunning, they get their bud photosynthesis, which it still needs to grow, and can raise their body temperature if it is low. By staying in the shade, they can wait for their flower to give them energy through the photosynthesis they accomplished and can cool down their body temperature. This growth stage may also cool down by getting in mud or water, if it is available. Ivysaur, like Bulbasaur, started out in Kanto, but have since been exported to and released in Johto and Central Kalos. The other regions have since made laws that make releasing a starter Pokemon in the wild illegal, so there are no wild Bulbasaur in Hoenn, Sinnoh, Unova, or Alola. The thriving populations are good, as more of this species are needed in the wild, but is also bad, since native species suffer from the new invaders, and the already habituated Pokemon are not used to the new species.



Relationship with Humans

This species's endangered status has already been discussed in the previous profile, so for more information on that, please consult the Bulbasaur profile. 


Otherwise, Ivysaur have little to do with humans, with Ivysaur generally wanting to stay as far away as possible from humans and people not wanting to associate with wild Ivysaur. Captive individuals are a completely different story. They are often kept by Trainers, as in battle, they can be ferocious, determined opponents. Contest champions also love to keep them, and in contests, judges look for a healthy bud and leaves, and a well kept appearance in the animal itself. They are fairly rarely kept as pets, due to the tremendous care needed to support one. Hunting is obviously illegal, so that is out of the question. The animals actually have very little association with cultural traditions, unlike some other, more famous Pokemon. 


The selling of captive Ivysaur is heavily monitored, and Trainers need to fill out a special waiver, because this species, like any starter, is capable of horrendous destruction and damage if used in the wrong ways. Despite this, many daycare centers put captive Ivysaur as watchdogs over sleeping baby Pokemon, to protetc them from people who may steal them for their own unscrupulous purposes. 




Social and Individual Behavior

Social-wise, Ivysaur are practically recluses. They prefer not to associate with other Pokemon, even other members of their own species, gender, or growth stage, even when they have their flowers folded up so they cannot be seen by predators. During this stage, females are loaded with estrogen and males with testosterone, and so prefer to remain by themselves. Additionally, even with their hidden flowers, a group of Ivysaur is fairly noticeable even when they try to be quiet, as their vines can be seen touching each other in contact, and they often inadvertently make quite a bit of noise, so groups are rare, usually only seen in captivity. When provoked, they ill try not to get physical with the enemy, preferring to paw the ground, hiss, snap their beak, and shake their head. These are all signs of an angered Ivysaur, so if you see one doing this outside of battle, and in your direction, back away slowly. If there is no other choice, they will bite, claw, and whip with their vines, which is usually enough to get a predator to back off. One reason they are solitary is because they are very territorial, defending their territory viciously, and marking it with excrement and scratches. If two individuals come into contact, they will hiss, and engage in a head butting contest to establish who is stronger. The one that gives up first loses, and the other can take their territory and food. 


In terms of individual behavior, they are similar to Bulbasaur. Wild animals are naturally afraid of humans due to obvious reasons, and will hide whenever people enter its habitat, which happens rarely due to their international protection. Domestic individuals are usually much calmer around people, and are generally quiet, caring animals, despite their ferocious, angry appearance. They are mild-mannered animals, usually having been taught since a young age as a Bulbasaur, in most cases, that is. They are generally not as good caregivers, since they are bigger and a bit more irritable than Bulbasaurs. However, they are excellent watchdogs over baby Pokemon, protecting the baby with its life and ferociously attacking anything unfamiliar that dares try to take the baby. This is why most owners of Pokemon are well acclimated to the Ivysaur who will watch over their Pokemon, so that they will not be attacked when they come to get it. They are also notoriously forgiving, like babies, allowing Trainers who have been away a long time or that abandoned them to become their trainers again. 




Tips for Keeping an Ivysaur:

Most tips for Ivysaur are similar to Bulbasaur, so consult those tips as well. Here, I will discuss tips which are unique to this growth stage or those which have not been mentioned yet.


- FEED THEM MORE PROTEIN. Ivysaur are much more carnivorous in this stage then they are both as a baby and as an adult. They need more protein in order to grow into their third and usually last growth stage. See Diet, Habitat, and Range for food options. Feed them these every third day, with the rest of their diet being made up of plant staples, the same as Bulbasaur.

- DON'T KEEP THEM IN A POKEBALL FOR MORE THAN 8 HOURS. True, this may mean you will get less sleep if you are a late-riser, but it also means that your Ivysaur will be much happier and more energetic. Animals kept in Pokeballs for longer than 8 to 9 hours often develop severe depression, do not get along well with other Pokemon, and may be aggressive towards other Pokemon outside of battle or even you and other Trainers. 

- ALLOW IT TO SHARPEN ITS TUSKS BEFORE BATTLE. Its tusks are a vital aspect in battle, and are used in many moves. It is important, however, that its tusks are sharp. So let it sharpen its tusks before battle, on rocks or logs. It will be a much better battle for you if you let it do so. 

- LET IT USE ITS SCENTED CHEMICALS, JUST NOT IN STRONG DOSES. As already stated, strong doses of the sweet-smelling scent they can produce can put people and Pokemon alike to sleep. Usually Trainers wear oxygen masks or tanks in casual Pokemon battles, as the Trainer needs to remain awake in order to direct their Pokemon. The scent will be effective against the Pokemon, but won't be against the Trainer, which is how its supposed to be. In times of tension and stress, you may also want to allow the Ivysaur to make the aroma, in order to calm everyone down, such as after a fierce battle or argument between friends.

- DON'T RELEASE AN IVYSAUR INTO THE WILD. If the time comes when you cannot afford to possess, or do not need an Ivysaur, which is very rare, do NOT release it into the wild. First of all, this is illegal in most regions, and only under special circumstances can you legally do this. It's best just to not take the risk and give them to a responsible owner who knows how to take care of them and can do so. It's actually recommended to just not give up your Ivysaur unless you absolutely have to, because even if they are very loyal and forgiving, they are usually very emotionally hurt and can take a long time to recover.

- IF IT SHOWS SIGNS OF AGGRESSION, QUICKLY PUT IT BACK IN ITS POKEBALL. Not only is this the logical thing to do, since putting it in a Pokeball means that it cannot hurt other Pokemon or people, including you, but the Pokeball is also the Ivysaur's own little world, a place where it can calm down and relax. 

- IF YOUR IVYSAUR STARTS HEAD BUTTING ANOTHER, LET IT HAPPEN, UNLESS IT GETS VIOLENT. Ivysaur do this head butting contest to establish which male is stronger, and usually do it over food and territory. There is no food and territory to fight over in captivity, so let them do it. It isn't harmful, they will just head butt and hiss. If yours wins, give it encouragement, but let it know that the other Ivysaur did well too, so that it doesn't get too snobby and proud. If yours loses, comfort it, and let it know that it's not the end of the world, just a little battle, and that you will help train it to make it stronger, if that makes it feel better.

- MAKE SURE IT DOESN'T ENGAGE IN UNNECESSARY BATTLES. During this time, females are loaded with estrogen, and males with testosterone. The estrogen in females and testosterone in males causes them to be quick-tempered, even when captive and well-cared for, usually in the weeks before growing into their next stage. During these few weeks, they may be more irritable than normal, and may even try to pick fights with other Pokemon because of their increasing testosterone. Don't let it hurt others's Pokemon if not in a battle. Calm it down, and put it in your Pokeball if necessary.


Alright guys, that's my profile, hope you guys like!

Alright, I shall begin the series with the first Pokemon in the National Pokedex, Bulbasaur!



Greater Flower-Back
Bulbusreptilium magna
Length: 2-3 feet (0 meters)
Weight: 10-15 lbs.
Height: 1-2 feet (counting bulb on back)
Diet: Roots, tubers, rhizomes, bulbs, nuts, berries, seeds, leaves, bark, shoots, invertebrates, eggs, occasionally small vertebrates, and garbage
Habitat: Sparsely treed grasslands, plains, savannas, and open prairies with trees
Range: Kanto, Johto, and Central Kalos


The first, baby form of the Greater Flower-Back is popularly known as "Bulbasaur." This individual growth stage is quite small, usually about 2 feet tall, counting the large bulb on their back, being about a foot tall at the shoulder. They range from 10 to 15 pounds in weight, depending upon the amount of food available and their subspecies. They have greenish-blue scaly skin, with darker blue-green scales scattered around their body. This coloration might make it stand out in open grasslands, but serves it well for its forested or treed environment. Their eyes are red, with white slits serving as the pupils. They actually rely less on their eyes than they do their hearing and smell, and as such the eyes can only make out blurry pictures of an object or animal. They have large whitish patches around the eyes, often mistaken for being part of the eye. In terms of build, they are stocky and squat, with muscular limbs and powerful jaws. They possess scaled ridges above the eyes, culminating in two prominent spikes located on the back of the head, which may sometimes be mistaken for ears. These are used to an extent to differentiate males and females. Males have longer, larger spikes than females do. Its snout is wide and broad, and is equipped with two sharp tusks in the lower jaw, which it will frequently sharpen against logs and fallen trees in order to make them more suitable for their job: to protect it when in close combat. They are also used to dig up roots and tubers for food. Its snout may be short, but it is effective in what it does. It ends in a slightly curved beak, which is used to snip plants, small animals, and predators alike. 




Classification and Growth Stages:
In terms of relation to other species of animals, Bulbasaur and its "evolutions", Ivysaur and Venusaur, are dicynodonts, tusked therapsids that were long believed to have gone extinct in the Permian period. However, Kanto in particular is renown for having Pokemon long believed to be dead. 

How they survived is still a mystery, but scientists heavily believe that they took refuge in special pockets under the ground, in the sides of mountains and such. They stayed in here for millions of years, fed by plants who grew on the sunlight let in by small, but abundant "spotlights", holes in the pockets that fed to the outside. They evolved and adapted in these pockets, and eventually grew into the species we know today. 


In terms of evolutions, they are one of the few Pokemon that are actually the same species. They simply go through three, sometimes four growth stages in their lives.  Changing into the next growth stage for a Greater Flower-Back is something like what shedding a skin is for a snake: during this time, they will sleep for long periods of the day, refrain from exerting themselves, eat little, and grow exponentially. They are very irritable when woken up during this time and should be left alone to prevent any trouble. A blue crust will appear over the animal's eyes, which looks and sounds disgusting, but is actually to strengthen the eyes for spotting predators and prey in their next growth stage. Some trainers see their lack of work as lazy, but it is in fact a natural process. The animals need to put all the energy they have into fueling their growing bodies, and cannot afford to use it for anything else. Once they are finished growing, a process which can take days, they will get up and eat ferociously, to sate their incredible hunger after not eating for several days, maybe even weeks. 

All Bulbasaur in Kanto have a natural instinct to travel to a little-known forest when they are ready to grow into their next stage. They are led by an adult, which protects them and herds them to the forest. Spots in the forest with sun are hotly contended, and fights can and will often break out over prime territory. 





Biology
However, so far, we have glossed over their most distinctive, unique characteristic: the large, greenish bulb on their back. This is actually the first form of a plant known as Floremagnus giganticus, a large species of flower that can be found wherever Greater Flower-Backs can be found. The process by which this plant takes root on the baby's back is simple. The seeds of a Floremagnus plant are eaten by the mother, usually a day or two before laying eggs. Once she lays her eggs, she proceeds to defecate all over them. The dung hopefully contains the seeds of the large flower. These seeds will then usually penetrate the still soft egg shell, and take root on the back of embryo. Over the course of several days, usually about a week, the seed will slowly be absorbed into the embryo's skin painlessly, and will remain there until hatching, still just a seed. After the animal hatches, though, the plant can truly start to take form. It uses the amniotic fluid in the egg to grow, and it's soil is the skin of the embryo. It just needs sunlight: and once the baby hatches, it can get that. It has all that it needs to grow, and it starts to do so. The plant will begin to flourish, wrapping sticky vines around the animal's abdomen to ensure that it will not fall off, though the chances of this happening anyway are slim. The plant, over a few weeks, will then produce a large bulb, which will eventually grow into a flower when they become an adult, or Venusaur. The plant also already produces vines, long and covered with tiny hooks, which can wrap around prey and predator's alike. The roots of the plant penetrate the back, and one long single root is connected to the brain. This is how the animal is able to control the plant on its back and its vines, which it will often to use to strangle or whip opponents in battle. The tips of the vines can also open to grab prey, like extra hands. Many animals will prey on Bulbasaur, as the animals are small, weak, and relatively helpless. True, their vines can be used to some effect, but these are often ripped or torn off by predators to neutralize the threat. Thankfully, it can regrow these vines within a matter of days. But once their vines are eliminated, the animals are near defenseless, only able to bite and claw, and they cannot run away, as their stocky, squat build prevents them from running very fast. On reason they remain in the sun is that their plant needs the sun to perform photosynthesis. An interesting aspect of this species is that since it is connected to the body, it can release some of the energy it gains during photosynthesis to the animal to use. This is how their symbiotic relationship works: Bulbasaur eat seeds, excreting them in waste and spreading them out, as well as providing a moving platform for the plant, and the plant in turn gives its energy to the animal to use, and also allows its vines to be used by the animal for its own benefit. 



Diet, Habitat, and Range

Bulbasaur will eat nearly anything, as they are very adaptable, opportunistic animals. They will usually try to eat anything they can fit in their mouths, which, with their large, powerful, wide jaws, can be a wide variety of things. In the wild, they generally dig up roots, tubers, seeds, and bulbs, but will also consume leaves, bark, twigs, shoots, nuts, berries, rhizomes, and fallen fruit. They also readily consume many types of arthropods and other invertebrates, normally worms, snails, and insects, usually by digging them out of their hiding places, catching them with their vines, and dropping the hapless creatures in their mouths. They may also occasionally consume small vertebrates, usually reptiles, amphibians, or mammals. They may also sometimes consume carrion, though this has rarely been documented. In urban areas, they will also consume apple cores, banana peels, and anything else consumable that they find in the garbage.

When training a Bulbasaur, it is important to keep in mind that they use the energy they get from their food to fuel their flower. If you are a contest champion and want a beautiful, healthy looking Bulbasaur, feed it healthy foods. Generally, roots, tubers, seeds, and bulbs will do: vegetables like onions, garlic, shallots, turnips, parsnip, rutabaga, carrots, sweet potatoes, radishes, and the like. Leaves from surrounding trees, any kinds of grass shoots (non-poisonous, of course), nuts (almonds, pecans, walnuts, cashews, pretty much any nut), berries (strawberries, cherries, blueberries, blackberries, ace berries, and goji berries, to name a few), and fruit (apples, oranges, bananas, pears, peaches, grapes, lemons, etc.) are all excellent staples for a growing Bulbasaur. If you want to congratulate them after a good contest or battle, you can afford to feed them a few candies, though only a few, because these are generally not the healthiest things for them to eat.


Bulbasaur are nowadays usually found in sparsely treed grasslands, savannas, prairies, and forested plains in Kanto, Johto, and Central Kalos. These habitats are perfect for them because they provide equal sunny and shady areas. Bulbasaur are cold-blooded, meaning that they are the temperature of the environment around them. They need to maintain a healthy body temperature by not getting too cold nor too warm. They accomplish this by sunning and staying in the shade. By sunning, they can accomplish two things: they can raise their internal body temperature, making them warmer and more ready for physical activity, and they can sun their growing bulb, which needs sunlight in order to thrive. By staying in the shade, they really only get to lower their body temperature, but this is useful after a tough battle or a case where they exerted lots of physical energy, to cool down, so to speak. Bulbasaur actually originated in Kanto and were unique to that region, but have since been introduced to areas of central Kalos and Johto, as they are starter Pokemon. In both these other regions, so many have been released into the wild, usually by owners who didn't know what to do with them, that they have set up a stable population and are thriving. This is actually good, because more wild Bulbasaur are needed in the world, for reasons explained below, but also bad because they are detrimental to native species which have become accustomed to the habitat.




Endangered Status and Relationship with Humans

Unfortunately, Bulbasaur is listed as endangered on the Endangered Species List, for obvious reasons. If you do not know, allow me to explain: in the past, Bulbasaur were taken from the wild to supply the growing demand for "starters": any one of three Pokemon for each region that embodied three different types of natural occurrence: Grass, Water, and Fire. Bulbasaur is the Grass starter of the Kanto region. Starters are often the first main Pokemon a trainer will get, and, while taking any "starter" Pokemon from the wild is prohibited, and anyone who does so will be severely punished, the damage has been done. Now Greater Flower-Backs are rare in the wild, with most being found in captivity under the care of trainers. They have also been, in the past, poached for their skins, which were made into handbags and other accessories. This too has been outlawed, and if a person is caught doing it they will suffer severe fines and up to 10 years in prison. Thankfully, now multiple reservations, international parks, and regional parks have been set up to protect the Greater Flower-Back, among other species. Security is tight at these facilities, and all death that happens here is natural, and not caused by people. Reintroduction and breeding programs have also been started to make these animals more abundant in the wild. Most Bulbasaur one will see these days are feral or wild. Instead of being taken from the wild, Bulbasaur are now carefully bred on naturalistic sanctuaries, which take great care of their animals will simultaneously helping individuals in the wild through conservation efforts. 


They are frequently used in Pokemon battles, as they can use their vines to startling effect for such a small Pokemon. They are also prized in contests for healthy looking bulbs. Other than this, they have few connections with humans, due to the general dislike of being in close contact such an endangered species. They are usually not dangerous, but can be ferocious if provoked.



Social and Individual Behavior

In terms of social behavior, Bulbasaur live in loosely based groups usually consisting of 6 individuals, known as herds. A typical herd will remain in area of about 15 square feet. Animals will sometimes remain closer in order to reduce the chances of being picked off by a predator. They will often maintain contact with other individuals by gently touching vines or through grunts and hisses. When they sense a predator or threat, they will crack their bulb's vines, sending all the animals in the herd on a high alert. When threatened, all the animals will hastily attempt to dig burrows in soft earth and hide in them, as they are prodigious diggers, having experience digging out food. If worst comes to worst, they will hiss, bite, claw, and whip predators with their vines. This is usually enough to make a predator back off, and this is because in an attack like this they use all the weapons in their arsenal. 


Wild individuals are often instinctively afraid of humans, and will do anything possible to get away from them. Domestic, captive-bred individuals, though, are generally much more mild-mannered, having been taught to be gentle since a young age. If given the correct training, they rarely act up, and indeed, can be great care-givers. At some sanctuaries, a few Bulbasaur have even been assigned to take care of other Pokemon babies, sometimes of different species. They manage to do this well by using their vines to swaddle the baby Pokemon and rock them soothingly, until the baby falls asleep. It will fiercely guard the animal it is taking care of and will protect them with its life. Along with being gentle and caring, they are also extremely loyal, and have been known to forgive trainers after they have been away a long time or after abandoning them. 




Tips for Keeping a Bulbasaur:

- ALLOW THEM ACCESS TO SUN AND WATER. If you want to have a healthy, long-lived Venusaur, supplying them with plenty of water and sunlight is key. The sunlight  is useful for the baby because it uses it not only to warm up after cold nights, gaining energy for later battles, which is important for Trainers, but also because the bulb on its back needs sunlight to grow into the flower that appears as a Venusaur. Supply it with plenty of water too, as the animal needs water to remain hydrated, but so does the flower to grow. A watering can is always helpful when keeping a Bulbasaur. Keep in mind that if the flower doesn't get enough water, it will start to use the water inside of the animal's body, so make sure to keep it well-watered!

- ALLOW THEM TO SOCIALIZE WITH OTHER BULBASAUR. Bulbasaur are social creatures. It is their nature to socialize and communicate with others. So, let it do so. If you do not allow your Bulbasaur to communicate with other Bulbasaur, or even other Pokemon, it will quickly sink into a state of depression and become much more reliant on you than you may want it to be. Allow it to be with some other Bulbasaur for a while. If they show signs of aggression, just calmly remove your Bulbasaur from the group and take it to another group. 

- DON'T BE HARD ON THEM. They're babies, and they're still learning to use and harness their powers to protect others. During this stage, they are inexperienced, curious, and playful, and may accidentally hurt humans or other Pokemon or break objects without meaning to. Don't be hard on them. Let them know that it was an accident and that no harm was done (if it was, just ensure that the other human/Pokemon is okay). 

- FEED THEM HEALTHY FOODS IF YOU WANT THEM TO LIVE LONGER AND GROW STRONGER. As already stated, Bulbasaur need to eat healthy foods in order for them and their bulb to grow normally and without issues. A little bit of candy is okay once in a while, like if they do well in a contest or battle, but these can only be given sparingly, or they'll learn to expect candy from you and may become aggressive when not given any.

- NEVER APPROACH A WILD BULBASAUR, EVEN IF IT IS ALONE. Chances are that the Bulbasaur, while it may appear alone, is actually in a very well-camouflaged herd hiding in the underbrush. Also, they are more than capable of defending themselves, so do not try to help it. Even if it is alone, let nature take its course. Your interference will only cause problems.

- DON'T TRIM ITS VINES. Many Trainers are under the impression that trimming its vines is a harmless, painless procedure for the Pokemon. Nothing could be further from the truth. Like previously stated, the bulb is actually connected to the brain, and as such nerves are able to control the vines. These nerves are sensitive, but not too sensitive. Still, a predator ripping them off hurts just as much as manually removing the vines. Don't do it: it causes the Bulbasaur pain and anguish.

- DO YOURSELF A FAVOR AND CLEAN UP AFTER IT. This goes for any Pokemon. Do everyone a favor and clean up after your Bulbasaur. Whenever you remove it from its Pokeball, have a small bag and a shovel you can use to scoop up and store its droppings. Stepping in a mixture of feces and uric acid isn't fun for anyone, so just clean up after your Bulbasaur when it makes a little mess. Additionally, they can carry coccidiosis in their droppings, which can be transmitted to other Pokemon and even humans, so clean it up, and wash your hands afterwards just in case.

- WHEN IT IS READY TO EVOLVE, DON'T USE IT IN BATTLE OR FOR ANYTHING ELSE. During this period, it is very lethargic, because it is growing into its next stage and needs to save its energy for fueling its own body for "evolution" and, of course, for its bulb. It will not only be very irritable if awoken, but may be severely injured as it is weak and overexerting itself can result in weakness as an Ivysaur or other defects.

- NEVER CATCH A WILD BULBASAUR OR TRESPASS ON PARKS OR RESERVATIONS. Bulbasaur are internationally protected as an endangered species, and any capture of them will result in heavy fines and up to 10 years in prison. It's never worth capturing a Bulbasaur just to get fined and put in jail. It's just a bad idea all around, especially as the Bulbasaur will usually be very upset that you caught it and may attack you if released from its Pokeball. Don't trespass on national parks or reservations either. Greater Flower-Backs are sometimes the main reason for these parks's existence, and if they see you trespassing, they can add the probable case of you attempting to steal a Bulbasaur to trespassing on national park property.

- ALWAYS WASH YOUR HANDS AFTER HANDLING A BULBASAUR, EVEN A DOMESTIC ONE. Most carry somewhat harmful diseases, ranging from coccidiosis to Salmonella. Almost all individuals carry some sort of disease that can be transmitted to people, wild or domesticated. When handling any sort of reptile, just realize that they all might carry diseases. This will help in persuading yourself to wash your hands diligently with soap and water. You may also want to clean objects or items they touched to rid it of Salmonella, including an emptied Pokeball. 

- SHOW IT HOW TO BEHAVE. A good way of teaching a baby to become a mild-mannered Venusaur is to teach it good habits when it's young. It will remember these and keep them to adulthood. For instance, show it how to handle a Pokemon. Most Bulbasaur don't just learn how to rock a baby Pokemon to sleep without some training. Keep in mind, they may have been taught a little bit of this at a sanctuary, but teach it to them anyway. When it sees how you handle a Pokemon, it will copy your moves and handle it similarly. Just teach it how to use its vines and strength in good ways, not bad ones. 

- IF YOUR BULBASAUR WISHES TO JOIN THE PROCESSION TO THE SPECIAL FOREST IN KANTO, LET IT. It will be an excellent opportunity to bond with other Bulbasaur, and will allow it to evolve in a naturalistic environment instead of a Pokeball. This allows them to hear, see, smell, taste, and touch different aspects of the wild, some which they may never have experienced before. It is a learning experience for them just as much as it is for you. Accompany them on their journey, but remain far away enough so that you can see it. It won't want you constantly hanging around, but it will appreciate if you just supervise it from a distance.



That's my Bulbasaur profile guys! Hope you like, and remember the tips!
Hello there everybody! I have decided to start making realistic Pokemon journals, where I detail a specific Pokemon as often as possible, probably every day or every other day if I have a lot of work. In the profiles, I explain their sometimes strange abilities through science, if possible, that is, and also detail their appearance, diet, habitat, reproduction (usually for only the adult Pokemon), and lifespan, as well as other aspects of their biology and whatnot. I will also include tips for beginning trainers when attempting to train their Pokemon. This is heavily inspired by the Pokemon reports by TipsyRa1d3n go check them out, they are very good. 



I will also explain how they evolve both in their canonical evolution lines, and what ancestor the species in general actually evolved from. I will try my best to come up with scientific explanations for every ability of the Pokemon, and I hope I will do alright. I will go through the National Pokedex with the profiles: that is, I will go Pokemon by Pokemon, each profile focused on a specific evolution in the evolutionary line (IF they are sufficiently different enough to be put in separate profiles. If they are too similar, I'll group them in one profile.), from Kanto to Alola. These will be written by a fictional professor I have made, Professor Maple, from a region my friends and I are designing, the Indiron region. Hope you guys will like! The first profile, for Charmander, should be up sometime this week. :D (Big Grin) 
Alright, finishing off the Bulbasaur lineage with Venusaur and Mega Venusaur!



Greater Flower-Back
Bulbusreptilium magna
Length: 6-7 feet
Weight: 150-230 lbs.
Height: 6-7 feet (at shoulder)
Diet: Roots, tubers, bulbs, rhizomes, nuts, berries, seeds, bark, shoots, leaves, invertebrates, eggs, occasionally small vertebrates, garbage
Habitat: Forested plains and savannas, treed grasslands, wooded prairies
Range: Kanto, Johto, and Central Kalos


The third, usually final growth stage in a Greater Flower-Back's life is popularly known as "Venusaur." A fully grown adult Venusaur is truly an intimidating sight, being from 6 to 7 feet long, from 150 to 230 pounds, and being 6 to 7 feet at the shoulder, with the flower on their back typically being another 3 or 4 feet. Their size will vary noticeably depending upon subspecies and the amount of food available to an individual. This growth stage is a dark bluish-green, more so than its previous growth stages. Unlike its previous growth stages, it lacks the scattered darker scales on the body that are present in Bulbasaur, and, to an extent, Ivysaur. Their dark coloration would normally restrict them to the darkest parts of the forested grasslands or full on woodlands or groves: that is, if they were the size of Ivysaur. Being much larger, and having very few predators, they can afford to remain in forested grasslands and wooded savannas. Still, in areas where they do have predators, they are usually found in groves and dense forests. This is because they are better camouflaged with the darker plants and shadows than in the more open grasslands. In this stage, their eyes have also gone back to possessing white pupils, still having red irises and barely noticeable white scleras. This is because in this stage they don't need eyesight as much as they have much fewer predators, and can rely upon their keen hearing and excellent sense of smell. The white patches around the eyes are very prominent in this stage, designed to make the eyes appear larger, so narrow the probability of a predator going for the actual eyes. They are squat, stocky, muscular animals, rather low to the ground compared to most other therapsid species. Because of this build, they cannot run very fast at all, so in a way they have traded speed for strength. They are strong for several reasons, but one of the main ones is to support the heavy flower on their back. Their jaws are exceptionally powerful, in the wild used for crushing nuts and seeds mainly, though also the bones of any predator daring to attack it. The scaled ridges above the eyes are perhaps the most prominent in this stage than any other, with the large spikes at the back of the head being particularly noticeable. There is a reason why though. The spines, as stated previously, are used to denote males and females: males have longer, more impressive spikes, females, shorter, less impressive ones. But in this stage, they also serve a second purpose: to ward off predators and rivals. They have  skin stretched across a portion of the spikes, and that skin can be flushed with blood, turning it a bright reddish-pink. By flushing the blood into these spikes, the spikes become brighter and even more noticeable, likely putting off any rival individuals or potential predators. This is frequently seen before fights or battles in the wild. Because of the pinkish coloration, they are frequently mistaken for ears. The wide, broad mouth can be used to intake large quantities of food at once, and ends in a sharp, hooked beak, which can be used to snap plant stems and meat alike. While mainly used for digging up food, it can also be used for defense against predators, as can the two large conical tusks, one on either side of the beak in the upper jaw. It also possesses four noticeable tusks on the lower jaw, but these are used mainly in feeding. It rarely needs to use them, so does not sharpen them frequently, but when it has to, it will usually use fallen trees, logs, or rocks. Their long, curved claws are useful when digging up food and slashing at enemies alike.



Classification and Growth Stages
Please consult the Bulbasaur profile for more information on this specie's evolutionary tree, but anyone who has studied up the least bit on prehistoric animals will instantly recognize, and rightfully so, that it is a dicynodont. This can be easily told by their squat, muscular build, strong legs, curved beak, and tusks, not to mention their short tails. The group as a whole was believed to have gone extinct in the Permian or Triassic period, but some survived: as to how, scientists are still researching, but for a theory, consult the Bulbasaur profile.


Venusaur and Mega Venusaur both belong to the same species, fairly rare for a "Mega" evolved animal, as most are different species, in the same genus, which are believed to be evolved from each other based on their similar appearances. The species that Venusaur and Mega Venusaur are is the Greater Flower-Back, the sole member of the Flower-Back family. 


An adult Greater Flower-Back will very rarely get a second growth stage, but the circumstances if it does so are very simple. If a Flower-Back reaches a great age, generally more than 70 years, they will grow into a second stage, "Mega Venusaur." More on this is described in the section for that growth stage, but essentially, when it is growing, it shows the same behavior as Bulbasaur and Ivysaur show when growing into their next stage. Sleeping for long periods of the day or even whole days is not uncommon, and irritability when woken up is to be expected. Generally tired and lethargic, when growing, they try not to exert themselves physically at all, and will eat very little or even nothing. When they are finished growing, they will eat ravenously over the course of the next day or days, to satisfy their aching stomachs after not eating for days or even weeks. The duration of the growth stage varies, but it typically takes about 3 weeks, sometimes less, sometimes more. When ready to grow, this species will find a suitable spot and hunker down, not bothering to go anywhere special like Bulbasaur. 






Biology & Reproduction
As an adult, the Greater Flower-Back is fully developed, and so is its flower. The flower instantly catches the eye of any person that happens to see an adult individual, and indeed, in the wild, many a researcher (including me, on several occasions) has been bewildered to see a large flower seemingly moving of its own accord, their eyes drawn to it, and only after taking it in realize that it is in fact a Venusaur trundling about. The plant and how it enters the animal's body are described in the Bulbasaur profile, but aspects of their biology that have not been mentioned will be discussed here. The Floremagnus giganticus has now reached its average adult stage: it grows a bit more if it gets enough sunlight and water. The flower still needs regular sun and water, but can survive on less than in previous growth stages, which is one reason why most animals do not grow into "Mega Venusaur": they don't need as much sunlight, so don't stay in it for as long as they need for the flower to grow into its final stage. The flower has now revealed itself, as well as a scaly trunk and leaves. In this stage, its vines are still not as powerful as they were as babies, but they are still a force to be reckoned with, about 8 feet long and tipped with razor-sharp, curved spines, which can actually be retracted into the vine itself if necessary. The huge pink flower, far from being a signal to predators, is in fact both a warning to predators and an invitation to prey. The color of the flower warns a predator of the animal's strength: light, whitish flowers mean a weak animal, while bright pink ones mean a strong animal. Dull, dark ones signify an animal that is not getting enough water or sunlight. It also acts as a beacon for prey. Prey, attracted by the bright colors of the flower, will usually not realize it is attached to an animal until it is too late: the animal can simply grab the unfortunate prey with its vines and eat it. All parts of the plant have a neural link to the brain, allowing the animal to control the plant as it wishes. Its vines are most frequently used, but the dark green leaves can also be used, to fold up around the flower and conceal it from sight. This is usually only done if they know they are facing a predator they cannot beat, so need to hide. The flower possesses a ridged, somewhat sharp, tough, brown, scaly trunk, for protection against possible predators that might try to cut it off at the stem. The center of the flower is fleshy, bendable, and yellow, and contains a pocket in the middle. This is where the scents are released from. Like Ivysaur, it possesses many different chemicals located in different pockets under the flower, which can be combined inside the flower to create a variety of smells, both good and bad. It generally does not release chemicals very frequently in the wild, but this is not the case for domestic animals; they will frequently emit a sweet-smelling, delicate, but carrying aroma. This chemical combination in particular actually has strong narcotics in it which can relax most vertebrates when it is breathed in. If used sparingly, they usually do not have negative effects on people or Pokemon, so is actually quite helpful. This is why people with stress or anxiety-related disorders often can be seen either keeping an Ivysaur or Venusaur, or wearing perfume that smells like the scent to calm them down. Despite this, if used too frequently and in large amounts, it can be so relaxing that it can put Pokemon and humans to sleep, a potentially very dangerous situation, outside of battle. This is one among many scents they can make, most of which are displeasing to the human nose, but excellent smelling to insects or pollinators. Some smells include those of certain flowers, rotting fruit, carrion, dung, or even the breeding pheromones of some insects or arthropods. The flowery scents will draw in pollinators, which are then eaten. The others will draw in select types of insects, which the animal can then capture and consume. The vines, while rarely used, are very effective against enemies, and can be used in different ways: to whip, to constrict, to throttle, etc. The vines are very helpful in battles, because of the thorns that line them. The vines are split at the ends, like hands, allowing it to grab prey or objects that it otherwise could not, lacking opposable thumbs or any sort of grasping ability in its feet. Because most animals, even wild, are very experienced and quick-witted, they can usually withdraw their vines before they are bitten or torn off, so generally last longer. They will grow back within a matter of days, but sometimes it just won't be quick enough, especially in areas with many predators. It will also claw and bite if necessary, but seeing as it is so slow, this generally doesn't have much of an effect. They certainly cannot run either, as their build does not allow it. They can burrow quite well, but making a burrow large enough for them to fit in may take a while, so they generally try to rely on their physical defenses instead of trying to burrow. It still needs the sun to photosynthesize the flower, albeit less, and will die if not exposed to it. In return for the animal spreading its seeds and moving it around, the flower will allow some of the energy it gains through photosynthesis to be used by the animal. It also repays the animal by being able to attract prey and camouflage the animal among plants. 


Their reproduction is fairly simple. Females will grunt, hiss, and roar to establish that they are in heat. The body language of a receptive female and a non-receptive female are very clear. A receptive female will paw the ground, shake her head, and grunt, while non-receptive females will slash the air, click their beaks, and make threatening roars, as well as trying to attack any male that tries to mate with them. It is relatively rare, but when males come into conflict over females, they will fight, long and hard. These are only occasionally observed by researchers, so each fight that is seen is videotaped. During fights, males try to ward each other off non-physically at first. They will paw the ground, swish their tails, flush blood into their spikes, hiss, roar, and open their mouths wide, showing their sharp beak and tusks. If this fails, they will fight, smashing their tough skulls into each other's heads. The first one to back down or fall over loses, while the victorious individual gains the other's food, territory, and females. In terms of courtship behavior, they have none, not really needing to show off, as they have proved their strength by battling. Males who have not battled another usually need to show their strength to females, by, say, pushing over trees or other similar shows of power and healthiness. The female has a gestation period of about 3 or 4 months. Once ready to lay her eggs, she picks an area of about 30 square feet to lay her eggs. She typically has 3 clutches of eggs, spread out between two or three nests. 20 to 25 eggs will be laid in each nest. After digging the rudimentary, shallow depression in the ground, she will cover it back up to make it more difficult for predators to get to them, and to protect them from the elements. Before doing so, though, she will defecate all over her eggs. The reason for this is quite clear: it is to allow the seeds of the Floremagnus giganticus plant to penetrate the soft eggshell and then the back of the growing animal. More on that in the Bulbasaur profile. The female will typically have eaten the seeds of the flower a couple of days in advance, just so it has time to get through her system. As well as covering them with earth, she will typically collect leaves, sticks, and twigs, and put these on top of the nests, to make them more difficult to discover. She may or may not also make a false nest, digging a hole in the ground and covering it up, but not laying any eggs in it. This is to distract more intelligent predators and confuse them as to where the eggs are hidden. After being laid, the eggs typically hatch after 3 or 4 weeks, upon which time the babies will scurry off by themselves into the underbrush. They may band together for safety, they may not, but from now on, they are on their own. The mother will generally stay in the same area that she laid her eggs in (mostly because she is exhausted from laying them and is unwilling to move), but will provide no protection to the eggs if they are threatened. If there is a big enough threat, she may stand up to it, but this happens infrequently and she will often prefer to sleep. After all, laying 75 to 150 eggs in all is no mean feat. An interesting, but difficult way to determine a male from a female is by checking if the individual possesses a seed or seeds in the center of the flower on its back, in the stigma. This seed is there to tempt hungry birds or other seed-eating animals, which will hopefully carry it off, consume it, and then excrete it in droppings, as a form of seed dispersal. 


Diet, Habitat, and Range

Venusaur, due to their size, can eat essentially anything they desire, made more opportunistic due to their lack of pickiness and very adaptable diets. Their snapping beaks, tusks, and very strong stomach acid make short work of really anything that comes into their mouth. They will generally eat whatever is most prevalent in their habitats, but are more herbivorous in this stage than carnivorous. They mostly dig up roots, tubers, rhizomes, and bulbs, which are their main sources of food, but will also consume shoots, leaves, bark, twigs, grass, berries, nuts, seeds, and fallen fruit. Large invertebrates or eggs are taken as well, but vertebrates are very rare in this stage, as is carrion. Prey is mostly attracted by the scented flower, then grabbed with the vines, killed quickly by slamming it against rocks or logs, and then dropped into the mouth and swallowed. Feral individuals are extraordinarily rare, but will usually consume anything they can find in trash cans or dumpsters that is edible: banana peels, apple cores, thrown out-food, etc. 


Trainers will be fine if they feed adult Flower-Backs what they fed them as babies. They need less protein in this stage, so regular supplies of mice and crickets are not as necessary. The flower depends on the food just as much as the animal does, but this usually isn't hard to remember, as the flower is a key sign of their health. Strong, healthy adults can be used in both contests and battles alike, and often depend on healthy, nutritious foods. Try to mimic what they would eat in the wild with things you can get at a grocery store. For example, for roots, tubers, rhizomes, and bulbs, you can feed them a variety of vegetables, such as onions, garlic, shallots, turnips, carrots, radishes, parsnips, rutabaga, and sweet potatoes. For other plants, simply feed them any kind of grass shoots, leaves gathered from surrounding trees (know if they are poisonous: have an expert or a guidebook on hand to tell you), and a wide range of nuts, fruit, and berries. They will naturally consume grass, bark, and twigs, so there is no point in trying to feed them those, as they already eat them inside their Pokeballs and will also consume those plants if released from the ball. Almonds, pecans, walnuts, cashews, and more typically sate an adult's nut desire, but feel free to experiment with other nuts as well. Feeding them berries like strawberries, acai berries, blueberries, blackberries, goji berries, and cherries is a good idea, and feeding them fruits such as apples, oranges, bananas, pears, peaches, grapes, lemons, and more will definitely suffice for their fruit diet. Make sure to feed them plenty of fruit in the weeks before they grow into a "Mega" Venusaur, if they choose to do so. You can give your individual Bulbasaur candies sparingly, but don't overdo it: there are healthier options for the animal's to eat, and the candies are designed as treats anyway. They will naturally consume invertebrates inside and out of their Pokeball, but feeding them the occasional mouse, rat, or cricket will make them happy anyways. Turkey, chicken, beef, or eggs also work, though again, only occasionally. 


Venusaur can afford to live in lighter areas than their predecessors, provided the area is free of predators. Because of their size, they don't need to hide anymore, so can lie out in relatively open, light grasslands without worrying. In areas with predators, though, they generally can be found in forests and woodlands, where they camouflage better. These habitats are great for them because they provide sunning spots to warm up and photosynthesize their flower, and shady spots to cool down and sleep. They will also wallow in mud or water to cool down on hot days, if it is available. They can be found in Kanto, Johto, and the central areas of Kalos, though for various human-caused reasons are rare in all of these areas. Venusaur originated in Kanto, but have since been exported to and released in Kalos and Johto. Strict laws about releasing Pokemon of any kind have been put in place, which is why there are no wild Flower-Backs in Hoenn, Sinnoh, Unova, or Alola. These wild populations have pros and cons. The pro is that since they are breeding, they are increasing the animals's wild numbers, but the bad side is that they can wreak havoc on the populations of native species. The main reason for their export and import is, of course, for beginning Trainers to use. 




Relationship with Humans

Relations among this species and humans are strained, as they are internationally protected, as most people don't want to have anything to do with them just because of their protection. It is also strained because adult Flower-Backs are notoriously mistrusting of people, knowing what they can do to them and the power they hold.


Captive individuals have a closer bond with humans, but it is still somewhat rare. Unfortunately, even in battles adult Flower-Backs are rarely seen, because most Trainers simply don't have the patience to raise one. This is sad, because they are very ferocious, determined, persistent opponents in battle, and are good for both defense and offense and have a variety of powerful moves. Those planning to raise this species must know what they are signing up for: literally, as multiple waivers are needed to be able to keep one. Contest champions also sometimes possess Venusaur, as contests are held, albeit very occasionally, due to the general "ugliness" of these animals besides their flower. This is not really fair, seeing as how all animals possess beauty in their own ways: it just manifests in the Flower-Backs flower, not necessarily its physical body. Anyway, judges usually look for healthy, whole, good-smelling flowers,  a well-cleaned individual, and healthy mouths, eyes, and nostrils, to make sure none are diseased. These animals require a tremendous amount of care for anybody, hence why they are not often trained. Hunting is out of the question for obvious reasons. They are featured very little in cultural practices, religions, or traditions. 


Aside from being difficult to care for in terms of money (food, space, water, etc.), the other main reason they are hard to keep is their extraordinarily long lifespans. The longest lived known animal lived to an age of 132 years, 8 months, and 16 days. Many have had similarly long lifespans. The average age for an adult at the time of its death is 80 years old. To date, the oldest person who possessed a Greater Flower-Back was a man named Thomas Edwards, who got the animal when he was 10, when the animal was a baby, and died at the age of 95, while his animal survived another 15 years. It was believed that in some royal families, they would hand down the Greater Flower-Back through the generations as some kind of living family heirloom, an interesting practice, but one that was undoubtedly depressing for the animal, as it watched its new masters grow old and die repeatedly. 


Feral animals are virtually nonexistent. The reason for this is because the Pokemon Protection Association rules them as "dangerous to humans if provoked." Any animal with this classification is monitored, although not particularly closely. People can't just walk to take the trash out and be attacked by a threatened Flower-Back. So, the PPA tranquilizes or stuns animals to neutralize the threat, and then, after a thorough check-over, starts to slowly introduce the animal back into the wild. A Flower-Back might not look particularly deadly, but a single snap from its beak can sever a limb, as two teenage boys discovered in 2045. 



Social and Individual Behavior

As adults, Greater Flower-Backs are hermits, recluses, living alone and almost never interacting with other members of their own species. Even members of the same sex, gender, or growth stage are totally shunned by others. In this stage, wild animals are aggressive, though usually only to humans if provoked. During this time, females are loaded with estrogen and males with testosterone, and it comes out in violent outbursts. It gets even worse during the breeding season. Males enter a highly temperamental period known as "musth", during which they will charge anything that they believe is a threat, which can be anything from trees, to vehicles, to other animals, to even boulders and logs. Females aren't aggressive in the weeks leading up to and following mating, but may protect their nests from predators, albeit somewhat halfheartedly. Still, a charging mother Flower-Back is not a pretty sight. When aggravated, they try to ward off the threat with non-physical warnings: shaking the head, stomping, pawing the ground, whipping their vines, snapping their beak, roaring, and hissing, among other things. If this fails, they will charge, biting, snapping, clawing, whipping, throttling, constricting, and trampling the threat. When confronted with an individual that shows these signs, slowly back away and try not to pose a threat. Males are territorial animals, marking their territory with scratches and excrement, and patrolling it frequently. Females generally settle in a specific area during the  breeding season, but are nomadic outside of it, grazing in many different areas to avoid stripping a place bare of food. Males usually will engage in  head-butting contests over food, territory, and females, with the one who gives out first or falls down being the loser. 


It is only after they reach "Mega" status that they begin to calm down, as mating is now very rare, so their estrogen or testosterone levels go down. Adults are feisty, quick-tempered, but intelligent animals, at least in the wild. Wild animals are not very afraid of humans, knowing that they can beat them physically, but definitely are wary of humans, knowing that they are far more intelligent than themselves. These animals will not hide when people get near it, but will keep an eye on the intruder. Domestic animals are not only calmer in general, but much less wary of humans, knowing that they are protected by their Trainer. Captive adults are loud, but caring, gentle animals. They are usually assumed to be aggressive because of their wild counterparts and their angry appearance caused by the eye ridges. They are usually mild-mannered, having been taught to be polite and caring from an early age, in most cases. They are not usually the best actual caregivers, but are excellent watchdogs for some facilities. They are ferocious towards anything that threatens the thing they are guarding, and will protect it with its life. They are less forgiving than juveniles, but are still lenient, knowing when the Trainer couldn't help it and when they could. 




Mega Venusaur

When an adult reaches an age of usually about 70, sometimes more, sometimes less (it depends on the gender of the animal and varies in every individual), they will start to become lethargic again, showing all the signs of growing into a new growth stage like they did when growing into juveniles or adults from their previous growth stages. Picking a sunny spot, they will lie down and sleep for most of the time. While growing, they will increase in size slightly, their back flower may develop more, and the flower sends a tendril down to the animal's forehead, where it grows a flower. Their skin color will also lighten. Within a few weeks, they will be finished and free to carry on with normal life.



In this stage, they have a lighter aquamarine coloration, and a few darker scales are present on the head. They vary little in physical appearance, but their plants grow tremendously. Developing a tougher, scaly wooden stem, the flower is well supported, and it will also grow new, lighter leaves, supported by individual woody stems, which usually bend under the weight of the leaves. Thankfully, these are held up by tough, durable dark green vines the plant produces, which are thick to stand up against the friction caused by rubbing up against the woody stem of the leaves. These leaves grow in addition to a bit of growth on the original leaves. The most noticeable new characteristic, though, is the large pink flower on their head. When growing, the flower will allow a long, snake-like tendril to creep up the neck and stop just above the skull, below the skin. It will then start to grow into a flower, slowly emerging from the skin and blossoming until it reaches maturity. 


The reasons for this fourth growth stage is debated among scientists, but it is possible that it shows strength and durability in the species and is seen as a sign of a healthy, albeit weathered, old, tough male. Females will usually mate more frequently with an animal that has gone through this growth stage than they will with weaker males, which usually will not survive to the age needed to grow into the next form. The healthy new flower is seen as a sign of power and tenacity. 


Their behavior changes little, although they will generally become much less aggressive, as they have little competition when in this stage that they need to worry about, so their testosterone and estrogen levels go down. 





Tips for Keeping a Venusaur:


Most tips for keeping this species are in the previous profiles, so consult them for more information. I will discuss tips here which I have not mentioned before. 



- DON'T BERATE THEM FOR BEING AGGRESSIVE. It's not their fault. They can't control their own testosterone levels. The rise is out of their control, so don't berate or chide them for what is physically impossible for them to accomplish.

- ALLOW THEM SOME PLACE TO CALM DOWN. Adults are aggressive. It's just their nature. You need to allow them some area in which they can rest and calm down from a battle or just from themselves. This can be inside a Pokeball or out, but make sure it is a peaceful place where they cannot be injured. 

- KNOW WHAT YOU ARE GETTING INTO. A Flower-Back can live upwards of 100 years, so you need to know what you are getting into when you get one, when it is in any growth stage. That's why they have you fill out waivers: to make sure you've got what it takes. If the animal is going to live longer than you, which almost always happens, make sure there is a responsible owner or other safe area it can be sent when you cannot care for it any longer. Another Trainer is sometime used, but a better idea is a Pokemon Sanctuary, where old, injured, or otherwise impeded Pokemon go to live out the rest of their lives. Sanctuaries are peaceful places which put the animals under their care first, so you are in good hands.

- TREAT THEM WITH RESPECT. Yes, they may be aggressive. They may not always do what you want them to do. But they still deserve respect. Being such large animals, they are capable of mass destruction, and you need to respect the animal as such. Doing so will likely make it respect you, so it is a win-win relationship. 

- KNOW WHAT TO DO DURING THE BREEDING SEASON. Animals, even captive ones, will become more cheeky and aggressive during the breeding season, especially males. Even domestic males will enter musth. During this time, you may want to allow them more access to their "calm place" than you usually do, or keep them in their Pokeball for longer than normal so that they don't go on rampages and destroy property or hurt people or other Pokemon. Also, there is the tricky situation of mating. Most captive individuals have no real desire to mate, being perfectly happy under the care of their trainer. If they do want to mate, though, there is no better place to let them go than Sanctuaries, or, if you desire, possibly the Pokemon Daycare. Generally, sanctuaries are held in higher esteem because they present a more natural environment, while Daycares are a little more humanized. 

- BE CAUTIOUS WHEN APPROACHING YOUR FEMALE VENUSAUR IF IT'S GUARDING ITS EGGS. If you possess a female Flower-Back and you let it go to the sanctuary or Daycare to mate, it will usually lay eggs. It will guard these, but not especially ferociously. It will keep an eye on anything that threatens them, however. During this time, many Trainers like to stay with their animal to watch the process of hatching and care for them. This is perfectly acceptable and even recommended, as the female is probably tired, but, be cautious when first approaching her. If you come to see the female consecutively, she won't mind, but she will be a little wary of any intruder to the nest area, even you, for the first few days. Just show her you mean no harm and would like to see the eggs hatch and care for her.

- IF YOU SEE A FERAL INDIVIDUAL, CALL THE PPA. DON'T TRY TO CATCH IT: IT'S FOR YOUR OWN GOOD. Feral individuals present a definite threat to people: with their size and weaponry, they could kill a human in a matter of seconds. This is why the PPA chooses to tranquilize and/or stun animals, remove them from the area, check them over, and then slowly start to rehabilitate them back to the wild, so that they can eventually be released back to hopefully boost the population a bit. Don't try to catch one: feral Venusaur are perhaps even smarter than domestic animals, and they know what they're doing. They will have snapped off all your limbs before you can say "Holy mother of Arceus."



What Species I Chose and Why: This is my little section for explaining what animal the Pokemon is based off of and why I chose it, in case someone didn't know what it was before or just didn't look. The entire Bulbasaur evolution line are dicynodonts, tusked therapsids believed to have gone extinct in the Triassic period. Why dicynodonts, you may ask? Well, let's look at some characteristics. Low, squat, stocky, muscular build? Check. Short tail? Check. Beak, complete with tusks? Check. You can see why I did so. Some people like making them as frogs or toads. I don't, because of the beak, and the feet don't match up with that of a frog or toad. 


Alrighty, that's it for the first evolution line. Hope you guys like!!


deviantID

Giganotosuchus
United States

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TitanChief10 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you for all the favorietes :D there is more coming soon 
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qwerty1118 Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2017  Hobbyist Filmographer

herro dra
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qwerty1118 Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2017  Hobbyist Filmographer
hey kai
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Giganotosuchus Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2017
Hey Paul!
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qwerty1118 Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2017  Hobbyist Filmographer
herro, its me from school
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Giganotosuchus Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2016
You're welcome!
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Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks for the watch :D
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